Music

Save Face release epic cover of My Chemical Romance's "Teenagers"

September 12, 2019

It’s been over a decade since My Chemical Romance released their song “Teenagers.” It was the last single to be released from their third full-length The Black Parade, an album that undoubtedly sent the New Jersey band off into the mainstream stratosphere. 


Since then, there have been countless covers of the song––one quick YouTube search will literally bring up thousands––but none done quite as well as their young Garden State peers in Save Face. Streaming everywhere today on their new split with Graduating Life, Save Face’s cover of “Teenagers” is near expert-level; it’s like vocalist Tyler Povanda’s voice was made to sing this song.


This new split between Save Face and Graduating Life seems to be inevitable; Tyler and Grad Life’s Bart Thompson have been friends for years, and even have their own podcast together.  The split features two young bands at their absolute best, including an epic Graduating Life cover of Kid Dynamite. Formed in 2017 by vocalist Bart Thompson, Graduating Life started out as a solo project. That year, he released An Introduction to Rock & Roll, and toured the US four times. Thompson, along with a few other members of Graduating Life, is also a member of bands such as Mom Jeans. and Just Friends.



“I don’t think I can do this anymore.” It’s a tangible ache that Povanda delivers on “Bummer,” the other track on Save Face’s side of the split. Here, the young songwriter and guitarist captures millennial existential dread at a near-expert level, as the song bursts open with a massive-sounding and massively-relatable chorus about figuring your shit out in a world that’s, well, gone to shit.

In keeping with Save Face’s ever-changing cast of bandmates, the video for “Bummer,” directed by Zach Miller, features way more musicians than the song probably requires, including members of Mom Jeans., Just Friends, and more. Tyler is the nucleus around which friends, former tourmates, and scene veterans revolve, making Save Face a completely freed and ever-changing entity with Povanda at the heart since 2012, triangulating Queen, Weezer, and Saves The Day into punkish blasts of wiry, intricate guitar-rock.

photo by connor meany



Save Face’s 2018 debut full-length Merci was a riveting concept record about an addict’s post-rehab struggles. It established Povanda as a feverishly creative composer, a quality that’s lifted Save Face to critical acclaim and fan adoration. Save Face as it exists now has that same commitment and vision, but the band is not the same. For Povanda, Save Face now is an endless new start, a hand-picked punk rock band that is constantly reinventing itself, its shows, and its records.



On their upcoming tour, Save Face will perform with five members for the first time ever—including members of tourmates Just Friends, a collection that reinforces the always-shifting but always-there-for-you nature of Povanda’s community. Povanda says the shows will be as they always have been: monumental, intentional, each not quite the same as the last. In the same way Save Face records are carefully crafted, so too are their shows. Get to one if you can. You never know which Save Face you’ll get.


Music

Save Face release epic cover of My Chemical Romance's "Teenagers"

September 12, 2019

It’s been over a decade since My Chemical Romance released their song “Teenagers.” It was the last single to be released from their third full-length The Black Parade, an album that undoubtedly sent the New Jersey band off into the mainstream stratosphere. 


Since then, there have been countless covers of the song––one quick YouTube search will literally bring up thousands––but none done quite as well as their young Garden State peers in Save Face. Streaming everywhere today on their new split with Graduating Life, Save Face’s cover of “Teenagers” is near expert-level; it’s like vocalist Tyler Povanda’s voice was made to sing this song.


This new split between Save Face and Graduating Life seems to be inevitable; Tyler and Grad Life’s Bart Thompson have been friends for years, and even have their own podcast together.  The split features two young bands at their absolute best, including an epic Graduating Life cover of Kid Dynamite. Formed in 2017 by vocalist Bart Thompson, Graduating Life started out as a solo project. That year, he released An Introduction to Rock & Roll, and toured the US four times. Thompson, along with a few other members of Graduating Life, is also a member of bands such as Mom Jeans. and Just Friends.



“I don’t think I can do this anymore.” It’s a tangible ache that Povanda delivers on “Bummer,” the other track on Save Face’s side of the split. Here, the young songwriter and guitarist captures millennial existential dread at a near-expert level, as the song bursts open with a massive-sounding and massively-relatable chorus about figuring your shit out in a world that’s, well, gone to shit.

In keeping with Save Face’s ever-changing cast of bandmates, the video for “Bummer,” directed by Zach Miller, features way more musicians than the song probably requires, including members of Mom Jeans., Just Friends, and more. Tyler is the nucleus around which friends, former tourmates, and scene veterans revolve, making Save Face a completely freed and ever-changing entity with Povanda at the heart since 2012, triangulating Queen, Weezer, and Saves The Day into punkish blasts of wiry, intricate guitar-rock.

photo by connor meany



Save Face’s 2018 debut full-length Merci was a riveting concept record about an addict’s post-rehab struggles. It established Povanda as a feverishly creative composer, a quality that’s lifted Save Face to critical acclaim and fan adoration. Save Face as it exists now has that same commitment and vision, but the band is not the same. For Povanda, Save Face now is an endless new start, a hand-picked punk rock band that is constantly reinventing itself, its shows, and its records.



On their upcoming tour, Save Face will perform with five members for the first time ever—including members of tourmates Just Friends, a collection that reinforces the always-shifting but always-there-for-you nature of Povanda’s community. Povanda says the shows will be as they always have been: monumental, intentional, each not quite the same as the last. In the same way Save Face records are carefully crafted, so too are their shows. Get to one if you can. You never know which Save Face you’ll get.


Music

Save Face release epic cover of My Chemical Romance's "Teenagers"

October 21, 2019

It’s been over a decade since My Chemical Romance released their song “Teenagers.” It was the last single to be released from their third full-length The Black Parade, an album that undoubtedly sent the New Jersey band off into the mainstream stratosphere. 


Since then, there have been countless covers of the song––one quick YouTube search will literally bring up thousands––but none done quite as well as their young Garden State peers in Save Face. Streaming everywhere today on their new split with Graduating Life, Save Face’s cover of “Teenagers” is near expert-level; it’s like vocalist Tyler Povanda’s voice was made to sing this song.


This new split between Save Face and Graduating Life seems to be inevitable; Tyler and Grad Life’s Bart Thompson have been friends for years, and even have their own podcast together.  The split features two young bands at their absolute best, including an epic Graduating Life cover of Kid Dynamite. Formed in 2017 by vocalist Bart Thompson, Graduating Life started out as a solo project. That year, he released An Introduction to Rock & Roll, and toured the US four times. Thompson, along with a few other members of Graduating Life, is also a member of bands such as Mom Jeans. and Just Friends.



“I don’t think I can do this anymore.” It’s a tangible ache that Povanda delivers on “Bummer,” the other track on Save Face’s side of the split. Here, the young songwriter and guitarist captures millennial existential dread at a near-expert level, as the song bursts open with a massive-sounding and massively-relatable chorus about figuring your shit out in a world that’s, well, gone to shit.

In keeping with Save Face’s ever-changing cast of bandmates, the video for “Bummer,” directed by Zach Miller, features way more musicians than the song probably requires, including members of Mom Jeans., Just Friends, and more. Tyler is the nucleus around which friends, former tourmates, and scene veterans revolve, making Save Face a completely freed and ever-changing entity with Povanda at the heart since 2012, triangulating Queen, Weezer, and Saves The Day into punkish blasts of wiry, intricate guitar-rock.

photo by connor meany



Save Face’s 2018 debut full-length Merci was a riveting concept record about an addict’s post-rehab struggles. It established Povanda as a feverishly creative composer, a quality that’s lifted Save Face to critical acclaim and fan adoration. Save Face as it exists now has that same commitment and vision, but the band is not the same. For Povanda, Save Face now is an endless new start, a hand-picked punk rock band that is constantly reinventing itself, its shows, and its records.



On their upcoming tour, Save Face will perform with five members for the first time ever—including members of tourmates Just Friends, a collection that reinforces the always-shifting but always-there-for-you nature of Povanda’s community. Povanda says the shows will be as they always have been: monumental, intentional, each not quite the same as the last. In the same way Save Face records are carefully crafted, so too are their shows. Get to one if you can. You never know which Save Face you’ll get.