Music

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS: Dikembe

September 30, 2020

I can't tell you how many times I get hit up by bands, artists and PR people looking to have me write about their song/video/album/whatever. Guess that's a side effect of refusing to label No Earbuds as one thing or another, but it's forced me to start thinking more about how NO EARBUDS can further support the community.

A lot of times, the music people send me is great, but it may not always be a fit to work on from a PR, management, or marketing perspective, for a multitude of different reasons. So I've decided to start a series where I can talk a little more about some of the artists I'm digging that I'm not working with, and it's called NO EARBUDS PRESENTS. It's not gonna be some music journalist bullshit; that's not me. It's just gonna be my thoughts and vibes from a record, a song, a video... whatever I'm into at the moment.

And just like everything else here, that title may become an even bigger thing down the line; a home base for whatever the heck I feel like doing next. Hopefully, as always, you discover some new stuff to listen to and maybe learn something positive in the process. That would be rad.

___________

___________

___________

___________

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS:

DIKEMBE
MUCK

bandcamp / vinyl

Sometimes I'll get sent a record and it's GREAT but the timing just doesn't line up. I fucking hate when that happens, but it happens. After being a fan of Dikembe for like 6-7 years now, it happened with their new record, Muck. I was pregnant and due right around the time they were initially planning for it to come out, and then COVID happened, pushing everything back. In the end, we weren't able to work together but I got to watch as a fan while they rolled the record out this past summer and built SO much natural momentum around it––even though I wasn't a part of it, I was low key so proud to see them absolutely kill it. So I wanted to write a little something about them and this record, and maybe it makes a few more of you go check it out today. Again, that would be rad.

Remember the emo revival? That was almost a decade ago, give or take. At the time, it was a total rush to see these prominent music writers and influencers give bands in the genre much-deserved attention from the masses, but I don't think any of us could've imagined the impact it would have on the artists themselves.

The hype died out just as fast as it started. Editors got tired of the emo revival and outlets gave less space to those kinds of records. Sure, there are OBVIOUSLY still people talking about emo –– they're basically all my best friends. Shout out to yall. But let's be real for a second. Maybe half of those bands are still making music today, and the ones that are are more than likely struggling to get that same level of mainstream attention again. Hell, it's gotten to the point where bands will continue putting out incredible records and projects but their most streamed tracks are always the ones associated with that era of their career. That's why Dikembe's new record, Muck, is so worth paying attention to. This is a band that initially benefitted off the wave of the emo revival (also, please know how much I hate typing that; it was only a revival for the people who stopped paying attention), but eventually found themselves at war with it instead.

That's where Muck comes in, though. This is Dikembe at their most vulnerable, taking the reigns back and accepting their darkest thoughts head-on. Written after guitarist/vocalist Steven Gray's mother passed away, the album examines loss and life from this stark perspective––it practically forces you to do some deep thinking. It's a grim and introspective listen, but I've always loved records like that. Just hit me with that real shit! That's what Muck does so well. It's real as fuck. It accepts its flaws and wears them like badges of honor. Fuck expectations, this is Dikembe going full Dikembe and I love it.

The promo for Muck was next level, too. They started by launching their own sidescroller video game (!!) where you could collect records and unlock new music. Then they dropped that incredible video for "All Got Sick" –– I feel like everyone I follow was sharing that when it came out. Not only was it hilarious but it took a more creative approach to the socially distant music video that we're all still figuring out how to do well.

Anyway, I love to see Dikembe taking their power back and doing what they want. Helps that they're working with Skeletal Lightning now, who are prob some of the most artist-friendly folks out there. It feels like Dikembe's got a new energy with this record and I'm very much here for it. Please be sure to check it out –– 20% of proceeds from the album sales will be donated to Grace Marketplace, a vital charity that aims to benefit the lives of people in need in the Gainesville area, where the band is from.

favorite tracks:

All Got Sick, Stay Beat, Shame, Perfect Mess

RIYL:
Smashing Pumpkins, Small Brown Bike, Hum

Music

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS: Dikembe

September 30, 2020

I can't tell you how many times I get hit up by bands, artists and PR people looking to have me write about their song/video/album/whatever. Guess that's a side effect of refusing to label No Earbuds as one thing or another, but it's forced me to start thinking more about how NO EARBUDS can further support the community.

A lot of times, the music people send me is great, but it may not always be a fit to work on from a PR, management, or marketing perspective, for a multitude of different reasons. So I've decided to start a series where I can talk a little more about some of the artists I'm digging that I'm not working with, and it's called NO EARBUDS PRESENTS. It's not gonna be some music journalist bullshit; that's not me. It's just gonna be my thoughts and vibes from a record, a song, a video... whatever I'm into at the moment.

And just like everything else here, that title may become an even bigger thing down the line; a home base for whatever the heck I feel like doing next. Hopefully, as always, you discover some new stuff to listen to and maybe learn something positive in the process. That would be rad.

___________

___________

___________

___________

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS:

DIKEMBE
MUCK

bandcamp / vinyl

Sometimes I'll get sent a record and it's GREAT but the timing just doesn't line up. I fucking hate when that happens, but it happens. After being a fan of Dikembe for like 6-7 years now, it happened with their new record, Muck. I was pregnant and due right around the time they were initially planning for it to come out, and then COVID happened, pushing everything back. In the end, we weren't able to work together but I got to watch as a fan while they rolled the record out this past summer and built SO much natural momentum around it––even though I wasn't a part of it, I was low key so proud to see them absolutely kill it. So I wanted to write a little something about them and this record, and maybe it makes a few more of you go check it out today. Again, that would be rad.

Remember the emo revival? That was almost a decade ago, give or take. At the time, it was a total rush to see these prominent music writers and influencers give bands in the genre much-deserved attention from the masses, but I don't think any of us could've imagined the impact it would have on the artists themselves.

The hype died out just as fast as it started. Editors got tired of the emo revival and outlets gave less space to those kinds of records. Sure, there are OBVIOUSLY still people talking about emo –– they're basically all my best friends. Shout out to yall. But let's be real for a second. Maybe half of those bands are still making music today, and the ones that are are more than likely struggling to get that same level of mainstream attention again. Hell, it's gotten to the point where bands will continue putting out incredible records and projects but their most streamed tracks are always the ones associated with that era of their career. That's why Dikembe's new record, Muck, is so worth paying attention to. This is a band that initially benefitted off the wave of the emo revival (also, please know how much I hate typing that; it was only a revival for the people who stopped paying attention), but eventually found themselves at war with it instead.

That's where Muck comes in, though. This is Dikembe at their most vulnerable, taking the reigns back and accepting their darkest thoughts head-on. Written after guitarist/vocalist Steven Gray's mother passed away, the album examines loss and life from this stark perspective––it practically forces you to do some deep thinking. It's a grim and introspective listen, but I've always loved records like that. Just hit me with that real shit! That's what Muck does so well. It's real as fuck. It accepts its flaws and wears them like badges of honor. Fuck expectations, this is Dikembe going full Dikembe and I love it.

The promo for Muck was next level, too. They started by launching their own sidescroller video game (!!) where you could collect records and unlock new music. Then they dropped that incredible video for "All Got Sick" –– I feel like everyone I follow was sharing that when it came out. Not only was it hilarious but it took a more creative approach to the socially distant music video that we're all still figuring out how to do well.

Anyway, I love to see Dikembe taking their power back and doing what they want. Helps that they're working with Skeletal Lightning now, who are prob some of the most artist-friendly folks out there. It feels like Dikembe's got a new energy with this record and I'm very much here for it. Please be sure to check it out –– 20% of proceeds from the album sales will be donated to Grace Marketplace, a vital charity that aims to benefit the lives of people in need in the Gainesville area, where the band is from.

favorite tracks:

All Got Sick, Stay Beat, Shame, Perfect Mess

RIYL:
Smashing Pumpkins, Small Brown Bike, Hum

Music

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS: Dikembe

October 1, 2020

I can't tell you how many times I get hit up by bands, artists and PR people looking to have me write about their song/video/album/whatever. Guess that's a side effect of refusing to label No Earbuds as one thing or another, but it's forced me to start thinking more about how NO EARBUDS can further support the community.

A lot of times, the music people send me is great, but it may not always be a fit to work on from a PR, management, or marketing perspective, for a multitude of different reasons. So I've decided to start a series where I can talk a little more about some of the artists I'm digging that I'm not working with, and it's called NO EARBUDS PRESENTS. It's not gonna be some music journalist bullshit; that's not me. It's just gonna be my thoughts and vibes from a record, a song, a video... whatever I'm into at the moment.

And just like everything else here, that title may become an even bigger thing down the line; a home base for whatever the heck I feel like doing next. Hopefully, as always, you discover some new stuff to listen to and maybe learn something positive in the process. That would be rad.

___________

___________

___________

___________

NO EARBUDS PRESENTS:

DIKEMBE
MUCK

bandcamp / vinyl

Sometimes I'll get sent a record and it's GREAT but the timing just doesn't line up. I fucking hate when that happens, but it happens. After being a fan of Dikembe for like 6-7 years now, it happened with their new record, Muck. I was pregnant and due right around the time they were initially planning for it to come out, and then COVID happened, pushing everything back. In the end, we weren't able to work together but I got to watch as a fan while they rolled the record out this past summer and built SO much natural momentum around it––even though I wasn't a part of it, I was low key so proud to see them absolutely kill it. So I wanted to write a little something about them and this record, and maybe it makes a few more of you go check it out today. Again, that would be rad.

Remember the emo revival? That was almost a decade ago, give or take. At the time, it was a total rush to see these prominent music writers and influencers give bands in the genre much-deserved attention from the masses, but I don't think any of us could've imagined the impact it would have on the artists themselves.

The hype died out just as fast as it started. Editors got tired of the emo revival and outlets gave less space to those kinds of records. Sure, there are OBVIOUSLY still people talking about emo –– they're basically all my best friends. Shout out to yall. But let's be real for a second. Maybe half of those bands are still making music today, and the ones that are are more than likely struggling to get that same level of mainstream attention again. Hell, it's gotten to the point where bands will continue putting out incredible records and projects but their most streamed tracks are always the ones associated with that era of their career. That's why Dikembe's new record, Muck, is so worth paying attention to. This is a band that initially benefitted off the wave of the emo revival (also, please know how much I hate typing that; it was only a revival for the people who stopped paying attention), but eventually found themselves at war with it instead.

That's where Muck comes in, though. This is Dikembe at their most vulnerable, taking the reigns back and accepting their darkest thoughts head-on. Written after guitarist/vocalist Steven Gray's mother passed away, the album examines loss and life from this stark perspective––it practically forces you to do some deep thinking. It's a grim and introspective listen, but I've always loved records like that. Just hit me with that real shit! That's what Muck does so well. It's real as fuck. It accepts its flaws and wears them like badges of honor. Fuck expectations, this is Dikembe going full Dikembe and I love it.

The promo for Muck was next level, too. They started by launching their own sidescroller video game (!!) where you could collect records and unlock new music. Then they dropped that incredible video for "All Got Sick" –– I feel like everyone I follow was sharing that when it came out. Not only was it hilarious but it took a more creative approach to the socially distant music video that we're all still figuring out how to do well.

Anyway, I love to see Dikembe taking their power back and doing what they want. Helps that they're working with Skeletal Lightning now, who are prob some of the most artist-friendly folks out there. It feels like Dikembe's got a new energy with this record and I'm very much here for it. Please be sure to check it out –– 20% of proceeds from the album sales will be donated to Grace Marketplace, a vital charity that aims to benefit the lives of people in need in the Gainesville area, where the band is from.

favorite tracks:

All Got Sick, Stay Beat, Shame, Perfect Mess

RIYL:
Smashing Pumpkins, Small Brown Bike, Hum