Music

new Rosie Tucker?!

January 13, 2020
credit: Jocelyn Raulston

"You don't even eat me out!" Today Rosie Tucker (they/them) shares one of their most biting and vulnerable creations, a new track called “Brand New Beast.”

If we learned one thing about the Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter over the last year, it’s that their talent is absolutely relentless. Between their debut album Never Not Never Not Never Not, which was named The Alternative’s #1 record of 2019, and the more recent single “Ambrosia,” Tucker painted vivid characters and landscapes with life and wit, turning each song into a world of its own. Some were delicate and sincere, others wry and precise.

Rosie says of "Brand New Beast": “This is a song about feeling so beholden to the desires of another person and so neglectful of one’s own needs that resentment comes to obscure what initially connected both parties in the first place."

That description is immediately apparent; the mere 1 minute and 38 seconds of “Brand New Beast” is a nonstop callout but it’s done in such an eloquent way, comparing the feeling of being neglected that Rosie compares to that of a reptile in a cage.

“Brand New Beast” is available to stream everywhere today.

Made with close collaborators Wolfy, Anna Arboles, and Jessica Reed, who form a muscular, guitar-driven quartet, "Ambrosia" follows up Tucker's 2019 label debut Never Not Never Not Never Not, an album heaped with praise by NPR, who called Tucker "sincere, with a gift for metaphor and a clear understanding of just how precarious life can be," as well as Stereogum, Paste, Uproxx, LA Weekly, The Grey Estates, and The Alternative, who wrote, "there are many moments on Never Not Never Not Never Not when all of the components (vocals, lyrics, instrumentals) conjoin into one, succinct display of perfection."

Tucker’s songs call to mind a few contemporaries: Hop Along, Frankie Cosmos, Mitski. And they evoke a few predecessors: cult-favorite singer-songwriters from the 1960s like Dusty Springfield, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Sibylle Baier, Norma Tanega, Karen Dalton. But Rosie Tucker songs are set apart in their specificity, self-awareness, and obvious care for the craft of songwriting and the practice of making art.

“I’m a big fan of musical eccentrics,” Tucker says. “I really appreciate creativity and zaniness. The spontaneous approach to music that Erik Satie took: he was very eccentric. He only ate eggs for a long time. He bought seven velvet suits and tried to start a religion. He composed music toiling in obscurity.

"I like art that happens when people toil in obscurity, although I guess that's not my goal right now.”

Music

new Rosie Tucker?!

January 13, 2020
credit: Jocelyn Raulston

"You don't even eat me out!" Today Rosie Tucker (they/them) shares one of their most biting and vulnerable creations, a new track called “Brand New Beast.”

If we learned one thing about the Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter over the last year, it’s that their talent is absolutely relentless. Between their debut album Never Not Never Not Never Not, which was named The Alternative’s #1 record of 2019, and the more recent single “Ambrosia,” Tucker painted vivid characters and landscapes with life and wit, turning each song into a world of its own. Some were delicate and sincere, others wry and precise.

Rosie says of "Brand New Beast": “This is a song about feeling so beholden to the desires of another person and so neglectful of one’s own needs that resentment comes to obscure what initially connected both parties in the first place."

That description is immediately apparent; the mere 1 minute and 38 seconds of “Brand New Beast” is a nonstop callout but it’s done in such an eloquent way, comparing the feeling of being neglected that Rosie compares to that of a reptile in a cage.

“Brand New Beast” is available to stream everywhere today.

Made with close collaborators Wolfy, Anna Arboles, and Jessica Reed, who form a muscular, guitar-driven quartet, "Ambrosia" follows up Tucker's 2019 label debut Never Not Never Not Never Not, an album heaped with praise by NPR, who called Tucker "sincere, with a gift for metaphor and a clear understanding of just how precarious life can be," as well as Stereogum, Paste, Uproxx, LA Weekly, The Grey Estates, and The Alternative, who wrote, "there are many moments on Never Not Never Not Never Not when all of the components (vocals, lyrics, instrumentals) conjoin into one, succinct display of perfection."

Tucker’s songs call to mind a few contemporaries: Hop Along, Frankie Cosmos, Mitski. And they evoke a few predecessors: cult-favorite singer-songwriters from the 1960s like Dusty Springfield, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Sibylle Baier, Norma Tanega, Karen Dalton. But Rosie Tucker songs are set apart in their specificity, self-awareness, and obvious care for the craft of songwriting and the practice of making art.

“I’m a big fan of musical eccentrics,” Tucker says. “I really appreciate creativity and zaniness. The spontaneous approach to music that Erik Satie took: he was very eccentric. He only ate eggs for a long time. He bought seven velvet suits and tried to start a religion. He composed music toiling in obscurity.

"I like art that happens when people toil in obscurity, although I guess that's not my goal right now.”

Music

new Rosie Tucker?!

May 26, 2020
credit: Jocelyn Raulston

"You don't even eat me out!" Today Rosie Tucker (they/them) shares one of their most biting and vulnerable creations, a new track called “Brand New Beast.”

If we learned one thing about the Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter over the last year, it’s that their talent is absolutely relentless. Between their debut album Never Not Never Not Never Not, which was named The Alternative’s #1 record of 2019, and the more recent single “Ambrosia,” Tucker painted vivid characters and landscapes with life and wit, turning each song into a world of its own. Some were delicate and sincere, others wry and precise.

Rosie says of "Brand New Beast": “This is a song about feeling so beholden to the desires of another person and so neglectful of one’s own needs that resentment comes to obscure what initially connected both parties in the first place."

That description is immediately apparent; the mere 1 minute and 38 seconds of “Brand New Beast” is a nonstop callout but it’s done in such an eloquent way, comparing the feeling of being neglected that Rosie compares to that of a reptile in a cage.

“Brand New Beast” is available to stream everywhere today.

Made with close collaborators Wolfy, Anna Arboles, and Jessica Reed, who form a muscular, guitar-driven quartet, "Ambrosia" follows up Tucker's 2019 label debut Never Not Never Not Never Not, an album heaped with praise by NPR, who called Tucker "sincere, with a gift for metaphor and a clear understanding of just how precarious life can be," as well as Stereogum, Paste, Uproxx, LA Weekly, The Grey Estates, and The Alternative, who wrote, "there are many moments on Never Not Never Not Never Not when all of the components (vocals, lyrics, instrumentals) conjoin into one, succinct display of perfection."

Tucker’s songs call to mind a few contemporaries: Hop Along, Frankie Cosmos, Mitski. And they evoke a few predecessors: cult-favorite singer-songwriters from the 1960s like Dusty Springfield, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Sibylle Baier, Norma Tanega, Karen Dalton. But Rosie Tucker songs are set apart in their specificity, self-awareness, and obvious care for the craft of songwriting and the practice of making art.

“I’m a big fan of musical eccentrics,” Tucker says. “I really appreciate creativity and zaniness. The spontaneous approach to music that Erik Satie took: he was very eccentric. He only ate eggs for a long time. He bought seven velvet suits and tried to start a religion. He composed music toiling in obscurity.

"I like art that happens when people toil in obscurity, although I guess that's not my goal right now.”