Music

Hit Like A Girl's new song is here to talk about your ex

November 5, 2019

                                                  art by Zoe Reynolds of Kississippi

Everyone’s got that “big ex,” you know which one I’m talking about. The person that maybe you thought was actually “the one,” the person you thought you might even marry someday.

It’s not unlike Hit Like A Girl’s Nicolle Maroulis (they/them) to wear their heart on their sleeve and in their music, but on their latest track “It’s Not Me,” they share one of the hardest breakup experiences of their lives. It’s a slow-burning, heavy anthem that reflects those lingering thoughts of “what if” that follow Nicolle to this day, with a sometimes-up, sometimes-down melody circling around the issue at hand…

“what will it take to make you happy? It’s not me.”

“Sometimes I still wonder if I made the right choice, sacrificing this person who I thought was meant for me to pursue my dreams of writing and performing music,” Nicolle explains.

Hit Like A Girl is currently on tour with Nervous Dater, and later, Nicolle will be playing keyboards with Kississippi as they embark on a winter tour with Mannequin Pussy.

Just last month, Hit Like A Girl released a track called “No More Dysphoria,” their first new single since 2018’s What Makes Love Last. Appropriately named after the band-run non-profit, the two go hand-in-hand as the track echoes all the same things Nicolle stands for in their music and as an organization. Founded in 2016, Nicolle created their own 501(c)3 non-profit No More Dysphoria to assist people going through various gender-related transitions and since, it's provided financial aid and emotional support to over 100 individuals.

No More Dysphoria started with a goal to raise money for transgender and nonbinary individuals to help them financially through major aspects of their transition, including but not limited to hormone therapies, gender-affirming clothing, binders, therapy sessions, and various gender reassignment surgeries. You can learn more by visiting www.nomoredysphoria.org.

                                                                photo by Giana Caliolo

Hit Like A Girl initially started as just a solo acoustic project. After spending years supporting their local music community, Nicolle transformed that love into a heavier, more energetic and fully-realized sound with the help of Frederick Pruden (guitar), Joseph Paventa (bass), Marco Caruso (drums), and more recently Liv Battell (drums) and Sawyer Camden (synth/trumpet). Their debut release You Make Sense, released in 2017, uncovered a stirring strength in Maroulis, utilizing the album’s eight tracks as a way to express and inspire vulnerability in anyone who listens.

Music

Hit Like A Girl's new song is here to talk about your ex

November 5, 2019

                                                  art by Zoe Reynolds of Kississippi

Everyone’s got that “big ex,” you know which one I’m talking about. The person that maybe you thought was actually “the one,” the person you thought you might even marry someday.

It’s not unlike Hit Like A Girl’s Nicolle Maroulis (they/them) to wear their heart on their sleeve and in their music, but on their latest track “It’s Not Me,” they share one of the hardest breakup experiences of their lives. It’s a slow-burning, heavy anthem that reflects those lingering thoughts of “what if” that follow Nicolle to this day, with a sometimes-up, sometimes-down melody circling around the issue at hand…

“what will it take to make you happy? It’s not me.”

“Sometimes I still wonder if I made the right choice, sacrificing this person who I thought was meant for me to pursue my dreams of writing and performing music,” Nicolle explains.

Hit Like A Girl is currently on tour with Nervous Dater, and later, Nicolle will be playing keyboards with Kississippi as they embark on a winter tour with Mannequin Pussy.

Just last month, Hit Like A Girl released a track called “No More Dysphoria,” their first new single since 2018’s What Makes Love Last. Appropriately named after the band-run non-profit, the two go hand-in-hand as the track echoes all the same things Nicolle stands for in their music and as an organization. Founded in 2016, Nicolle created their own 501(c)3 non-profit No More Dysphoria to assist people going through various gender-related transitions and since, it's provided financial aid and emotional support to over 100 individuals.

No More Dysphoria started with a goal to raise money for transgender and nonbinary individuals to help them financially through major aspects of their transition, including but not limited to hormone therapies, gender-affirming clothing, binders, therapy sessions, and various gender reassignment surgeries. You can learn more by visiting www.nomoredysphoria.org.

                                                                photo by Giana Caliolo

Hit Like A Girl initially started as just a solo acoustic project. After spending years supporting their local music community, Nicolle transformed that love into a heavier, more energetic and fully-realized sound with the help of Frederick Pruden (guitar), Joseph Paventa (bass), Marco Caruso (drums), and more recently Liv Battell (drums) and Sawyer Camden (synth/trumpet). Their debut release You Make Sense, released in 2017, uncovered a stirring strength in Maroulis, utilizing the album’s eight tracks as a way to express and inspire vulnerability in anyone who listens.

Music

Hit Like A Girl's new song is here to talk about your ex

November 8, 2019

                                                  art by Zoe Reynolds of Kississippi

Everyone’s got that “big ex,” you know which one I’m talking about. The person that maybe you thought was actually “the one,” the person you thought you might even marry someday.

It’s not unlike Hit Like A Girl’s Nicolle Maroulis (they/them) to wear their heart on their sleeve and in their music, but on their latest track “It’s Not Me,” they share one of the hardest breakup experiences of their lives. It’s a slow-burning, heavy anthem that reflects those lingering thoughts of “what if” that follow Nicolle to this day, with a sometimes-up, sometimes-down melody circling around the issue at hand…

“what will it take to make you happy? It’s not me.”

“Sometimes I still wonder if I made the right choice, sacrificing this person who I thought was meant for me to pursue my dreams of writing and performing music,” Nicolle explains.

Hit Like A Girl is currently on tour with Nervous Dater, and later, Nicolle will be playing keyboards with Kississippi as they embark on a winter tour with Mannequin Pussy.

Just last month, Hit Like A Girl released a track called “No More Dysphoria,” their first new single since 2018’s What Makes Love Last. Appropriately named after the band-run non-profit, the two go hand-in-hand as the track echoes all the same things Nicolle stands for in their music and as an organization. Founded in 2016, Nicolle created their own 501(c)3 non-profit No More Dysphoria to assist people going through various gender-related transitions and since, it's provided financial aid and emotional support to over 100 individuals.

No More Dysphoria started with a goal to raise money for transgender and nonbinary individuals to help them financially through major aspects of their transition, including but not limited to hormone therapies, gender-affirming clothing, binders, therapy sessions, and various gender reassignment surgeries. You can learn more by visiting www.nomoredysphoria.org.

                                                                photo by Giana Caliolo

Hit Like A Girl initially started as just a solo acoustic project. After spending years supporting their local music community, Nicolle transformed that love into a heavier, more energetic and fully-realized sound with the help of Frederick Pruden (guitar), Joseph Paventa (bass), Marco Caruso (drums), and more recently Liv Battell (drums) and Sawyer Camden (synth/trumpet). Their debut release You Make Sense, released in 2017, uncovered a stirring strength in Maroulis, utilizing the album’s eight tracks as a way to express and inspire vulnerability in anyone who listens.