Music

Good Luck Everybody, Love AJJ

January 18, 2020

Good Luck Everybody, the highly-anticipated seventh studio album from Phoenix’s AJJ out today, is a record reflective of our times. It’s pessimistic and sad, but with small pockets of love and grace. It’s bitter and funny and scary, like a scroll through your endless feed showing you everything all at once, whether you were prpared to see it or not. But in all of its pointing-out of the world’s atrocities and how we’ve all changed as a result, Good Luck Everybody still has an underlying message to it that seeks to inspire hope and change for the better.

This is a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalog; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

watch the new video for "Loudmouth" below:

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, Good Luck Everybody features guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimleywatch the video for "Mega Guillotine 2020" below:

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.

Music

Good Luck Everybody, Love AJJ

January 18, 2020

Good Luck Everybody, the highly-anticipated seventh studio album from Phoenix’s AJJ out today, is a record reflective of our times. It’s pessimistic and sad, but with small pockets of love and grace. It’s bitter and funny and scary, like a scroll through your endless feed showing you everything all at once, whether you were prpared to see it or not. But in all of its pointing-out of the world’s atrocities and how we’ve all changed as a result, Good Luck Everybody still has an underlying message to it that seeks to inspire hope and change for the better.

This is a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalog; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

watch the new video for "Loudmouth" below:

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, Good Luck Everybody features guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimleywatch the video for "Mega Guillotine 2020" below:

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.

Music

Good Luck Everybody, Love AJJ

January 20, 2020

Good Luck Everybody, the highly-anticipated seventh studio album from Phoenix’s AJJ out today, is a record reflective of our times. It’s pessimistic and sad, but with small pockets of love and grace. It’s bitter and funny and scary, like a scroll through your endless feed showing you everything all at once, whether you were prpared to see it or not. But in all of its pointing-out of the world’s atrocities and how we’ve all changed as a result, Good Luck Everybody still has an underlying message to it that seeks to inspire hope and change for the better.

This is a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalog; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

watch the new video for "Loudmouth" below:

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, Good Luck Everybody features guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimleywatch the video for "Mega Guillotine 2020" below:

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.