Music

get "Twice As High" with Roger Harvey

October 10, 2019

Everything changes. It’s something we experience from the very first moments of life, but somehow even throughout adulthood, its inevitability is often cause for alarm. On Roger Harvey’s new track “Twice As High,” the Pennsylvania-based songwriter attempts to slow things down, narrowing his sights to focus on the clarity that comes with it instead.

“I wrote Twice As High about the experience of searching for something that’s gone missing,” he explains. “As frightening as that may seem, it’s about the simplicity that’s all around us; we just so rarely choose to see it or let it in.”

About a month after writing the song, Roger traveled to Los Angeles on one of its rare rainy days. He drove out to the high desert of Joshua Tree with a close friend and filmmaker, Autumn Spadaro, to film a video for the track. “I hadn’t made any plans to record the song yet, but I knew I would. For me, sometimes backwards is better.”

Watch the video for “Twice As High,” which could honestly serve as an ad for the Joshua Tree tourism board, below:

Last month, Roger Harvey kicked off a new 7’’ single series with his version of Kacey Musgraves’ “Burn One With John Prine” –– BrooklynVegan praised the way Roger “put his spin on it,” declaring it a song that’s “very worth hearing,” while No Depression loved the track so much they put it in the top slot of their Best Of September playlist on Spotify.

The few remaining copies of the first 7’’, featuring “Twice As High” and “Burn One With John Prine” are available to order now: https://xorogerharvey.bigcartel.com/product/twice-as-high-b-w-burn-one-with-john-prine-7-no-004

Born and raised in rural Pennsylvania just footsteps from Lake Erie, Roger Harvey has been making music for the majority of his life. It brought him out & has taken him places that he never dreamt he’d be able to reach. Carrying him through the low times, enhancing the high times, and introducing him to so much rare beauty that otherwise would have been left unknown. It’s this deeply-spiritual connection to song that’s found Roger incessantly trying to catch the fleeting moments that many music makers and fans are drawn to.


But the struggles that come with a life in song are often more abundant. These hardships have been an integral part of the road Roger’s been winding down all these years. After the release of his sophomore album Two Coyotes (2017), he started to feel burnt out by it all. Continuing to follow advice from others to trace traditional avenues in a collapsing industry all seemed to lead to nowhere. In this process, Roger found himself farther and farther from the beauty and connection he had once discovered.

In reaction, he put together what he called Roger Harvey & Family shows –– a series of live events featuring the people and artists he’s connected with over the years, joining him in select cities were Tim McIlrath of Rise Against, Brendan Kelly of The Lawrence Arms, Greg Barnett and Tom May of The Menzingers, Augusta Koch of Cayetana, amongst many others –– through this he reconnected with the “what” and “why” of what landed him here.

“Getting people together to share in a moment simply with song in the center,” he says, enabled Roger to break through some of the walls he ran into, and he began redefining an approach that was more fitting for what he is after. These new songs are a centerpiece of that experience.

Music

get "Twice As High" with Roger Harvey

October 10, 2019

Everything changes. It’s something we experience from the very first moments of life, but somehow even throughout adulthood, its inevitability is often cause for alarm. On Roger Harvey’s new track “Twice As High,” the Pennsylvania-based songwriter attempts to slow things down, narrowing his sights to focus on the clarity that comes with it instead.

“I wrote Twice As High about the experience of searching for something that’s gone missing,” he explains. “As frightening as that may seem, it’s about the simplicity that’s all around us; we just so rarely choose to see it or let it in.”

About a month after writing the song, Roger traveled to Los Angeles on one of its rare rainy days. He drove out to the high desert of Joshua Tree with a close friend and filmmaker, Autumn Spadaro, to film a video for the track. “I hadn’t made any plans to record the song yet, but I knew I would. For me, sometimes backwards is better.”

Watch the video for “Twice As High,” which could honestly serve as an ad for the Joshua Tree tourism board, below:

Last month, Roger Harvey kicked off a new 7’’ single series with his version of Kacey Musgraves’ “Burn One With John Prine” –– BrooklynVegan praised the way Roger “put his spin on it,” declaring it a song that’s “very worth hearing,” while No Depression loved the track so much they put it in the top slot of their Best Of September playlist on Spotify.

The few remaining copies of the first 7’’, featuring “Twice As High” and “Burn One With John Prine” are available to order now: https://xorogerharvey.bigcartel.com/product/twice-as-high-b-w-burn-one-with-john-prine-7-no-004

Born and raised in rural Pennsylvania just footsteps from Lake Erie, Roger Harvey has been making music for the majority of his life. It brought him out & has taken him places that he never dreamt he’d be able to reach. Carrying him through the low times, enhancing the high times, and introducing him to so much rare beauty that otherwise would have been left unknown. It’s this deeply-spiritual connection to song that’s found Roger incessantly trying to catch the fleeting moments that many music makers and fans are drawn to.


But the struggles that come with a life in song are often more abundant. These hardships have been an integral part of the road Roger’s been winding down all these years. After the release of his sophomore album Two Coyotes (2017), he started to feel burnt out by it all. Continuing to follow advice from others to trace traditional avenues in a collapsing industry all seemed to lead to nowhere. In this process, Roger found himself farther and farther from the beauty and connection he had once discovered.

In reaction, he put together what he called Roger Harvey & Family shows –– a series of live events featuring the people and artists he’s connected with over the years, joining him in select cities were Tim McIlrath of Rise Against, Brendan Kelly of The Lawrence Arms, Greg Barnett and Tom May of The Menzingers, Augusta Koch of Cayetana, amongst many others –– through this he reconnected with the “what” and “why” of what landed him here.

“Getting people together to share in a moment simply with song in the center,” he says, enabled Roger to break through some of the walls he ran into, and he began redefining an approach that was more fitting for what he is after. These new songs are a centerpiece of that experience.

Music

get "Twice As High" with Roger Harvey

October 29, 2019

Everything changes. It’s something we experience from the very first moments of life, but somehow even throughout adulthood, its inevitability is often cause for alarm. On Roger Harvey’s new track “Twice As High,” the Pennsylvania-based songwriter attempts to slow things down, narrowing his sights to focus on the clarity that comes with it instead.

“I wrote Twice As High about the experience of searching for something that’s gone missing,” he explains. “As frightening as that may seem, it’s about the simplicity that’s all around us; we just so rarely choose to see it or let it in.”

About a month after writing the song, Roger traveled to Los Angeles on one of its rare rainy days. He drove out to the high desert of Joshua Tree with a close friend and filmmaker, Autumn Spadaro, to film a video for the track. “I hadn’t made any plans to record the song yet, but I knew I would. For me, sometimes backwards is better.”

Watch the video for “Twice As High,” which could honestly serve as an ad for the Joshua Tree tourism board, below:

Last month, Roger Harvey kicked off a new 7’’ single series with his version of Kacey Musgraves’ “Burn One With John Prine” –– BrooklynVegan praised the way Roger “put his spin on it,” declaring it a song that’s “very worth hearing,” while No Depression loved the track so much they put it in the top slot of their Best Of September playlist on Spotify.

The few remaining copies of the first 7’’, featuring “Twice As High” and “Burn One With John Prine” are available to order now: https://xorogerharvey.bigcartel.com/product/twice-as-high-b-w-burn-one-with-john-prine-7-no-004

Born and raised in rural Pennsylvania just footsteps from Lake Erie, Roger Harvey has been making music for the majority of his life. It brought him out & has taken him places that he never dreamt he’d be able to reach. Carrying him through the low times, enhancing the high times, and introducing him to so much rare beauty that otherwise would have been left unknown. It’s this deeply-spiritual connection to song that’s found Roger incessantly trying to catch the fleeting moments that many music makers and fans are drawn to.


But the struggles that come with a life in song are often more abundant. These hardships have been an integral part of the road Roger’s been winding down all these years. After the release of his sophomore album Two Coyotes (2017), he started to feel burnt out by it all. Continuing to follow advice from others to trace traditional avenues in a collapsing industry all seemed to lead to nowhere. In this process, Roger found himself farther and farther from the beauty and connection he had once discovered.

In reaction, he put together what he called Roger Harvey & Family shows –– a series of live events featuring the people and artists he’s connected with over the years, joining him in select cities were Tim McIlrath of Rise Against, Brendan Kelly of The Lawrence Arms, Greg Barnett and Tom May of The Menzingers, Augusta Koch of Cayetana, amongst many others –– through this he reconnected with the “what” and “why” of what landed him here.

“Getting people together to share in a moment simply with song in the center,” he says, enabled Roger to break through some of the walls he ran into, and he began redefining an approach that was more fitting for what he is after. These new songs are a centerpiece of that experience.