Music

Do yourself a favor and listen to Stuck Out Here

May 1, 2019

If you want to help spread the word about Stuck Out Here, first and foremost–– thank you!
Please contact me at
jamie@noearbuds.com

This year has been especially great for the Canadian punk rock scene; Toronto’s PUP and Pkew Pkew Pkew recently dropped their most successful records to date, and next month, Stuck Out Here will join them with the release of Until We’re Each Someone Else. The band’s second full-length will be out everywhere May 31 on Get Party! Records/Must Be Nice Records.

If you ask the members of Stuck Out Here –– which features co-frontmen/guitarists Cam Laurie and Ivan Raczycki, drummer Pat Armstrong, and Pkew Pkew Pkew’s Emmett O’Reilly on bass –– they’d say they’re not the best band in the world, but certainly not the worst.

What they leave out is where Until We’re Each Someone Else shines the most. There’s a uniquely-sentimental sort of angst that spans across the entire record and on perfect display in their latest single, “For You, For Me.” It’s a more laid-back feel than the album’s first single, “Embarass You,” but they’re both unquestionable anthems for the Fest generation.

Although Stuck Out Here officially formed in 2010, Cam, Ivan & Pat started playing together while still in high school as early as 2006, and Laurie and Raczycki had been circling one another for nearly their entire lives. They initially met as young kids playing soccer, but reconnected in high school covering Bright Eyes and Tegan & Sara songs at each others’ high schools’ coffee houses. Laurie had been getting into punk bands like The Clash while embracing the vulnerabilities and self-awareness of bands like the Weakerthans while Raczycki was jumping into anything from the rough energy of Against Me! to the poetic soundscapes of The National.

The result of their unlikely inspirations became the blueprint for Stuck Out Here’s 2011 debut, Last Night, This Morning and was crafted furthermore in 2014 with Getting Used to Feeling Like Shit. Musically, their forthcoming release Until We’re Each Someone Else exists somewhere amongst the pantheon of modern pop-punk classics like Joyce Manor’s Never Hungover Again, Japandroids’ Celebration Rock, and The Menzingers’ On the Impossible Past, with the creeping influence and affectations of a young Conor Oberst or Paul Westerberg.

Over the years, while their peers’ careers began to take off outside of Canada, Stuck Out Here doubled down on their focus to embrace their backyard (though they’ve maybe jumped a fence, or in this case a St. Lawrence River, to spend a weekend drinking and yellin’ their songs to whoever would listen). They quickly saw the most inclusive spaces were through local shows, and they were able to connect directly with new listeners and other bands they admired. They quickly learned how to take things into their own hands, and received some of their earliest opportunities opening for bands like Fake Problems and Chumped simply by reaching out and asking. Since, they’ve become a Toronto mainstay and have frequently supported bands like Cayetana, Joyce Manor, Chris Farren, Signals Midwest, and Swearin’. It was a system derived out of necessity but has since become synonymous with the band’s approach; bust your ass, but be cool and support your pals.

Until We’re Each Someone Else marks an entirely new moment and opportunity for Stuck Out Here to finally bring their music and mentality across borders, but don’t worry –– they’ll never stop showing love for the 6ix.

“We’ve benefitted so much from the relationships we’ve made in punk communities in Toronto and across Ontario, and we try not to take that for granted. Supporting one another as bandmates and members of Toronto’s artistic community has always been important to us. I mean, all my favourite bands are my friends and have been for years. We’re excited and honoured to add our little voice to it” Laurie explains.

Drummer Pat Armstrong agrees: “Since starting out, we’ve been very lucky to be involved in such an inspiring community of punks. We’ve always been amazed by who we can convince to come play shows in our hometown, the community and events like Montreals’ Pouzzafest develop into what they are, and all the amazing people we’ve met in between it all. It’s instilled in us that it’s most important to do what you like with the people you love as much as you possibly can, which is entirely why we keep this thing going.”

Music

Do yourself a favor and listen to Stuck Out Here

May 1, 2019

If you want to help spread the word about Stuck Out Here, first and foremost–– thank you!
Please contact me at
jamie@noearbuds.com

This year has been especially great for the Canadian punk rock scene; Toronto’s PUP and Pkew Pkew Pkew recently dropped their most successful records to date, and next month, Stuck Out Here will join them with the release of Until We’re Each Someone Else. The band’s second full-length will be out everywhere May 31 on Get Party! Records/Must Be Nice Records.

If you ask the members of Stuck Out Here –– which features co-frontmen/guitarists Cam Laurie and Ivan Raczycki, drummer Pat Armstrong, and Pkew Pkew Pkew’s Emmett O’Reilly on bass –– they’d say they’re not the best band in the world, but certainly not the worst.

What they leave out is where Until We’re Each Someone Else shines the most. There’s a uniquely-sentimental sort of angst that spans across the entire record and on perfect display in their latest single, “For You, For Me.” It’s a more laid-back feel than the album’s first single, “Embarass You,” but they’re both unquestionable anthems for the Fest generation.

Although Stuck Out Here officially formed in 2010, Cam, Ivan & Pat started playing together while still in high school as early as 2006, and Laurie and Raczycki had been circling one another for nearly their entire lives. They initially met as young kids playing soccer, but reconnected in high school covering Bright Eyes and Tegan & Sara songs at each others’ high schools’ coffee houses. Laurie had been getting into punk bands like The Clash while embracing the vulnerabilities and self-awareness of bands like the Weakerthans while Raczycki was jumping into anything from the rough energy of Against Me! to the poetic soundscapes of The National.

The result of their unlikely inspirations became the blueprint for Stuck Out Here’s 2011 debut, Last Night, This Morning and was crafted furthermore in 2014 with Getting Used to Feeling Like Shit. Musically, their forthcoming release Until We’re Each Someone Else exists somewhere amongst the pantheon of modern pop-punk classics like Joyce Manor’s Never Hungover Again, Japandroids’ Celebration Rock, and The Menzingers’ On the Impossible Past, with the creeping influence and affectations of a young Conor Oberst or Paul Westerberg.

Over the years, while their peers’ careers began to take off outside of Canada, Stuck Out Here doubled down on their focus to embrace their backyard (though they’ve maybe jumped a fence, or in this case a St. Lawrence River, to spend a weekend drinking and yellin’ their songs to whoever would listen). They quickly saw the most inclusive spaces were through local shows, and they were able to connect directly with new listeners and other bands they admired. They quickly learned how to take things into their own hands, and received some of their earliest opportunities opening for bands like Fake Problems and Chumped simply by reaching out and asking. Since, they’ve become a Toronto mainstay and have frequently supported bands like Cayetana, Joyce Manor, Chris Farren, Signals Midwest, and Swearin’. It was a system derived out of necessity but has since become synonymous with the band’s approach; bust your ass, but be cool and support your pals.

Until We’re Each Someone Else marks an entirely new moment and opportunity for Stuck Out Here to finally bring their music and mentality across borders, but don’t worry –– they’ll never stop showing love for the 6ix.

“We’ve benefitted so much from the relationships we’ve made in punk communities in Toronto and across Ontario, and we try not to take that for granted. Supporting one another as bandmates and members of Toronto’s artistic community has always been important to us. I mean, all my favourite bands are my friends and have been for years. We’re excited and honoured to add our little voice to it” Laurie explains.

Drummer Pat Armstrong agrees: “Since starting out, we’ve been very lucky to be involved in such an inspiring community of punks. We’ve always been amazed by who we can convince to come play shows in our hometown, the community and events like Montreals’ Pouzzafest develop into what they are, and all the amazing people we’ve met in between it all. It’s instilled in us that it’s most important to do what you like with the people you love as much as you possibly can, which is entirely why we keep this thing going.”

Music

Do yourself a favor and listen to Stuck Out Here

October 18, 2019

If you want to help spread the word about Stuck Out Here, first and foremost–– thank you!
Please contact me at
jamie@noearbuds.com

This year has been especially great for the Canadian punk rock scene; Toronto’s PUP and Pkew Pkew Pkew recently dropped their most successful records to date, and next month, Stuck Out Here will join them with the release of Until We’re Each Someone Else. The band’s second full-length will be out everywhere May 31 on Get Party! Records/Must Be Nice Records.

If you ask the members of Stuck Out Here –– which features co-frontmen/guitarists Cam Laurie and Ivan Raczycki, drummer Pat Armstrong, and Pkew Pkew Pkew’s Emmett O’Reilly on bass –– they’d say they’re not the best band in the world, but certainly not the worst.

What they leave out is where Until We’re Each Someone Else shines the most. There’s a uniquely-sentimental sort of angst that spans across the entire record and on perfect display in their latest single, “For You, For Me.” It’s a more laid-back feel than the album’s first single, “Embarass You,” but they’re both unquestionable anthems for the Fest generation.

Although Stuck Out Here officially formed in 2010, Cam, Ivan & Pat started playing together while still in high school as early as 2006, and Laurie and Raczycki had been circling one another for nearly their entire lives. They initially met as young kids playing soccer, but reconnected in high school covering Bright Eyes and Tegan & Sara songs at each others’ high schools’ coffee houses. Laurie had been getting into punk bands like The Clash while embracing the vulnerabilities and self-awareness of bands like the Weakerthans while Raczycki was jumping into anything from the rough energy of Against Me! to the poetic soundscapes of The National.

The result of their unlikely inspirations became the blueprint for Stuck Out Here’s 2011 debut, Last Night, This Morning and was crafted furthermore in 2014 with Getting Used to Feeling Like Shit. Musically, their forthcoming release Until We’re Each Someone Else exists somewhere amongst the pantheon of modern pop-punk classics like Joyce Manor’s Never Hungover Again, Japandroids’ Celebration Rock, and The Menzingers’ On the Impossible Past, with the creeping influence and affectations of a young Conor Oberst or Paul Westerberg.

Over the years, while their peers’ careers began to take off outside of Canada, Stuck Out Here doubled down on their focus to embrace their backyard (though they’ve maybe jumped a fence, or in this case a St. Lawrence River, to spend a weekend drinking and yellin’ their songs to whoever would listen). They quickly saw the most inclusive spaces were through local shows, and they were able to connect directly with new listeners and other bands they admired. They quickly learned how to take things into their own hands, and received some of their earliest opportunities opening for bands like Fake Problems and Chumped simply by reaching out and asking. Since, they’ve become a Toronto mainstay and have frequently supported bands like Cayetana, Joyce Manor, Chris Farren, Signals Midwest, and Swearin’. It was a system derived out of necessity but has since become synonymous with the band’s approach; bust your ass, but be cool and support your pals.

Until We’re Each Someone Else marks an entirely new moment and opportunity for Stuck Out Here to finally bring their music and mentality across borders, but don’t worry –– they’ll never stop showing love for the 6ix.

“We’ve benefitted so much from the relationships we’ve made in punk communities in Toronto and across Ontario, and we try not to take that for granted. Supporting one another as bandmates and members of Toronto’s artistic community has always been important to us. I mean, all my favourite bands are my friends and have been for years. We’re excited and honoured to add our little voice to it” Laurie explains.

Drummer Pat Armstrong agrees: “Since starting out, we’ve been very lucky to be involved in such an inspiring community of punks. We’ve always been amazed by who we can convince to come play shows in our hometown, the community and events like Montreals’ Pouzzafest develop into what they are, and all the amazing people we’ve met in between it all. It’s instilled in us that it’s most important to do what you like with the people you love as much as you possibly can, which is entirely why we keep this thing going.”