Music

AJJ endorses Mega Guillotine 2020!

December 10, 2019

On May 4, 2017, verified Twitter user @leyawn unveiled a patent application for a French Revolution-style guillotine with one blade and enough headrests for fifteen Congress members; a Mega Guillotine if you will. It only took Sean Bonnette of Phoenix, AZ’s AJJ a mere 30 seconds before pure inspiration took over and the song “Mega Guillotine 2020” practically wrote itself.

“Mega Guillotine 2020” is the latest track to be released from AJJ’s upcoming album Good Luck Everybody, out January 17. Its simplicity is nothing short of brilliant, making it one of the catchiest indie-folk tracks to come out all year, and it’s accompanying music video, directed by Teenage Stepdad, expertly depicts the kind of shock-humor that could explode Twitter’s egghead mafia into oblivion.

Good Luck Everybody will be a fitting start to a year that may change everything about the tidal wave reality that’s been life in America for the last three years. It’s also a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalogue; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimley

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, and featuring guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson,  Good Luck Everybody is being released via their new label, AJJ unlimited LTD, and on Specialist Subject Records in Europe.

Pre-orders are available now: https://www.ajjtheband.com/goodluck

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.

Music

AJJ endorses Mega Guillotine 2020!

December 10, 2019

On May 4, 2017, verified Twitter user @leyawn unveiled a patent application for a French Revolution-style guillotine with one blade and enough headrests for fifteen Congress members; a Mega Guillotine if you will. It only took Sean Bonnette of Phoenix, AZ’s AJJ a mere 30 seconds before pure inspiration took over and the song “Mega Guillotine 2020” practically wrote itself.

“Mega Guillotine 2020” is the latest track to be released from AJJ’s upcoming album Good Luck Everybody, out January 17. Its simplicity is nothing short of brilliant, making it one of the catchiest indie-folk tracks to come out all year, and it’s accompanying music video, directed by Teenage Stepdad, expertly depicts the kind of shock-humor that could explode Twitter’s egghead mafia into oblivion.

Good Luck Everybody will be a fitting start to a year that may change everything about the tidal wave reality that’s been life in America for the last three years. It’s also a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalogue; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimley

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, and featuring guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson,  Good Luck Everybody is being released via their new label, AJJ unlimited LTD, and on Specialist Subject Records in Europe.

Pre-orders are available now: https://www.ajjtheband.com/goodluck

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.

Music

AJJ endorses Mega Guillotine 2020!

December 16, 2019

On May 4, 2017, verified Twitter user @leyawn unveiled a patent application for a French Revolution-style guillotine with one blade and enough headrests for fifteen Congress members; a Mega Guillotine if you will. It only took Sean Bonnette of Phoenix, AZ’s AJJ a mere 30 seconds before pure inspiration took over and the song “Mega Guillotine 2020” practically wrote itself.

“Mega Guillotine 2020” is the latest track to be released from AJJ’s upcoming album Good Luck Everybody, out January 17. Its simplicity is nothing short of brilliant, making it one of the catchiest indie-folk tracks to come out all year, and it’s accompanying music video, directed by Teenage Stepdad, expertly depicts the kind of shock-humor that could explode Twitter’s egghead mafia into oblivion.

Good Luck Everybody will be a fitting start to a year that may change everything about the tidal wave reality that’s been life in America for the last three years. It’s also a collection of songs that will undoubtedly stand out in AJJ’s 15-year catalogue; while still rooted in the folk-punk sound they’ve become known for, Good Luck Everybody is unafraid to delve into new territories that test the limits of what they’re capable of.

1. A Poem
2. Normalization Blues
3. Body Terror Song
4. Feedbag
5. No Justice, No Peace, No Hope
6. Mega Guillotine 2020
7. Loudmouth
8. Maggie
9. Psychic Warfare
10. Your Voice, as I Remember It
11. A Big Day for Grimley

Produced by vocalist Sean Bonnette and bassist Ben Gallaty, and featuring guest appearances from Thor Harris, Jeff Rosenstock, Kimya Dawson, and Laura Stevenson,  Good Luck Everybody is being released via their new label, AJJ unlimited LTD, and on Specialist Subject Records in Europe.

Pre-orders are available now: https://www.ajjtheband.com/goodluck

photo by Giana Caliolo

When AJJ released their breakout album, 2006’s People Who Can Eat People Are The Luckiest People In The World, George W. Bush was the president of the United States. Songs like “People II: The Reckoning” outlined our collective nihilism while “Rejoice” celebrated the beauty in all of it anyway; it was an album that defined the relatively-hopeful feeling at the time that things would and could get better.


Now, nearly fifteen years and five albums later, AJJ returns with an album that, like People…, will undoubtedly define the feeling of post-2016 life in America. But for all of its dark leanings and its pessimistic reflections on modern culture, what AJJ does on this album is remarkable. It still serves to share one central message: basic human connection is the path to our collective return to sanity. It’s an album that will mark a time in our culture that cannot and will not be forgotten, and one that we will hopefully be able to learn from and grow past.

Good luck everybody.